Skip to content

Kwik Sew 3658 X 4

IMGP3399

When I find a pattern that I like, I sew the hell out of it. I like Kwik Sew 3658 and so I have sewn the hell out of it. Before I detail my Kwik Sew 3658 journey, let me tell you all the things I love about this pattern. First of all, it’s easy–like three pattern pieces easy. Second, it goes together kind of like Jalie 2682, but in dress form. It has that awesome Jalie 2682 neckline. Finally, it yields a dress that’s super-comfy but professional enough for work. So, for all of these reasons I’ve made four, yes four, different versions of this pattern.

2015-01-19 19.26.01I started by making my first version out of some paisley jersey that I bought at either JoAnn’s or Hancocks. I like this one, but the jersey doesn’t really have enough weight for this pattern. I tend to wear this one with leggings because it just doesn’t really feel like a dress.

2015-01-19 16.27.09

I made my second version out of some red scuba fabric that I bought at Fabrics.com. I love the way this one turned out–the Scuba was the perfect weight. Inspired by my success with the red scuba fabric, I ordered some printed neoprene from Mood fabrics. IMGP3415

IMGP3410

IMGP3412

IMGP3426

IMGP3429

I love the pattern on this fabric!! The neoprene was a little slippery and I had to work pretty hard for straight seams. I cut a size small and graded out to a medium in the hips. I serged all the seams and coverstitched the hems. It’s such an easy sew!!

Last, but not least, I made my fourth version out of black scuba from Fabric.com.

IMGP3399

IMGP3403

IMGP3402

IMGP3396

IMGP3433

To be honest, I made the last two versions of this dress this afternoon. I started cutting the fabric at around 1PM and finished the hem on the second dress at 5PM. This pattern goes together FAST!! I’m wearing the black version to work tomorrow! I LOVE having a new outfit on a Monday!! Have a good week y’all!!

 

 

McCalls’s 6840 + a yoke

 

image

I made McCall’s 6840 again, but this time I added a front yoke. I stole the yoke from McCall’s 6383.

001

I bought the flannel last year at Joann’s and then used some purple suiting that I had in my stash for the contrast.

image

image

image

I decided to go with some gray pearl snaps instead of buttons. Although my snap application process (involving a hammer, wooden thread spool, straight pin, and chopstick) did the trick, I have decided it’s time to invest in a snap press. There really has to be a more effective way to apply snaps!!

image

I LOVE this pattern!!! I plan on making one more version out of some Pendelton wool that I’ve had in my stash for a while.

image

image

image

Fool me once, shame on you; Fool me twice, shame on me!

IMGP3389

I made Simplicity 1878 for the first time about two and a half years ago and the result was bad–really, really bad. Here’s proof of just how bad it was.

So I guess time makes one forget or maybe I’ve just lost my mind. Honestly, I really have no idea how to explain why I did this, but I made Simplicity 1878 again. And guess what? The results were still really bad.

I’m not going to post pictures of me in this bad dress, but I will tell you that the neckline is gaping, the waist is nonexistent, and it makes me feel very, very lumpy. This pattern does not work for my body. Here it is on the dressform:

IMGP3374

I love the fabric, but the dress is a big ol’ paper bag.

IMGP3380

The darts in the back help a little, but not enough.

IMGP3379

It looks better on the dressform than it does on me and for that reason I am never, ever making this pattern again!! Such a bummer–I really like the fabric and I had such high, albeit unrealistic, hopes!!

In addition to my bag dress, I’ve been working on a hodge-podge of other projects.  I tried making some mittens out of a felted sweater and lined with Polartec fleece.

image

I added an Urban Threads thistle design to take things up a notch. I love the way they look and they really are super warm. The only problem is that they are so bulky–due to the very thick felted wool–that I really can’t use my hands when I am wearing them.

image

These are the sort of mittens a person would want if he/she were trudging through a winter wilderness. These are not mittens for driving. Maybe I need a new pattern???

image

I’ve also been working on a little throw quilt for my aunt’s 80th birthday. She loves dogs, so I used the scraps of my Spoonflower fabric and made a fleece throw.

image

 

image

I’ve also been working on a baby quilt for a woman that I work with. She’s chosen to decorate her son’s nursery in gray, orange, and mint green. Here’s what I have so far:

image

The fox applique is an Urban Threads design.

image

The shower is Friday afternoon, so I need to quilt and bind this thing pronto!!

Last, but not least, I made Louise a coat. We had a blizzard this past weekend and Louise got a little chilly. I put her in a coat that I had made for out dog Suzy, but that one has a giant “S” embroidered on it and I thought Louise needed her own coat.

image

image

image

image

Maybe it will grow on her!! :)

New Pillows

image

I made some new pillows for the futon in my sewing room! To be more precise, I made new pillow covers–no items were stuffed.

I actually made the one with the circle applique quite a few months ago. I used my Accuquilt circle die to cut the circles from felted wool. Then I used my Bernina circle foot to sew the circles on to the grey flannel squares. I love that circle foot. It makes me want to sew cirlces on to everything! After all the circles were appliqued, I sewed the squares together–and voila–a new pillow cover.

image

image

image2015-01-04 15.59.00

I used the Accuquilt hexagon die to cut the teeny tiny hexagons I used for my second pillow. After I had cut what seemed like 10000 hexagons, I arranged them and then sewed them onto some dark grey upholstery fabric I had in my stash.

image

imageimageimage

I am just mad about these teeny tiny hexagons!

 

Butterick 6253

image

I bought this pattern a couple of weeks ago when Butterick patterns were on sale at Joann’s. I think I bought it because I like the way the model’s chic, short hairdo looked with her turtleneck and flouncy jacket. The flowy silhouette is really not my style, but something about this pattern drew me in.

On the fourth official day of my sewcation, I decided to give this pattern a try. I used some left-over, double-velour Polartec (black) and some pink heathered fleece I found at Joann’s.

The directions tell you to sew  the tiers together with right sides facing up–this means that raw edges will be visible. I’m not too crazy about unfinished raw edges, so I serged the visible edges and then I applied the tiers to one another using my coverstitch machine. I omitted the sleeve cuffs and have not yet found a cord/tie (that I like) for my hood.

IMGP3261

I’ve got to do something about the wavy zipper–not sure what’s happening there–but I really do kinda dig this jacket. It’s a complete surprise to me. Flouncy stuff like this usually makes me look super short.

IMGP3298

IMGP3295

IMGP3296

IMGP3273IMGP3266

Who knew?? Maybe 2016 will be my year of flowy clothes! Happy New Year everyone!!

image

2015: My year of hacking

I believe that if you find a pattern or hack that you love, you should sew the hell out of it.  As you may or may not know, I love making Jalie 3352 out of 200 weight, sweater-faced Polartec fleece. I cut the largest size available, make the sleeves full length, and add a hood. The hood has an elongated neck and is cut with the front on the fold. I sew/serge 8 seams, coverstitch all hems and hood opening, and then wear it for days on end.

Here are the reasons I love this version of Jalie 3352:

  1. It is easy to cut and sew. I cut, sew, and finish the whole garment in about 2.5 hours.
  2. It consistently produces a cool-looking (yet warm-feeling) top.
  3. It is crazy comfortable.
  4. It is easy to wear–it looks good with jeans and requires no special care. It doesn’t wrinkle.
  5. It has a really cool cowl-necky hood and the sweater-faced fleece drapes perfectly with it.
  6. Did I mention that it’s comfortable?
  7. I get compliments on it. Here’s the deal: I like to wear the things that I sew, but when I do, I still worry that I look like Patchwork Polly wearing some sort of craft project. Sometimes when I’m at work, people will say, “Did you make that?” I say, “Yes” and they say, “Wow.” Those comments worry me. Not.good. But when I wear my Jalie 3352 hack, here’s what happens: I am in the check-out line, buying my groceries, and the 23-year-old cashier says, “Cool top!” I say, “Thanks, I made it.” She says, “OMG, no way!!” That interaction right there is the thing that makes me feel like I can really sew. It’s also the thing that makes me want to get better.

So here is my year of Jalie 3352 hacks.

My love affair began with this plum number. I got this Polartec on super sale and didn’t know what to make. My husband bought me a RTW top with a drop tail and elongated-hood, and I thought, “I bet I could make that.” Jalie 3352 had the hemline I wanted, so I gave it a try.

dolman 3

After my initial success, I wanted to make another. I got the black and gold, also on super-sale, so I tried it again.

dolman 4

Then a few months later, I had a big sewing failure. I spent a lot of time (and money) making what I thought would be a sensational garment, and it turned out to be a hot mess. I was down in the sewing dumps and needed a pick-me-up in the worst way. Jalie 3352 was my drug of choice–this time in 300 weight,  rust sweater-face. This baby is warm.

dolman 5

Then my addiction took hold. I started buying sweater-faced, 200 weight fleece with the full intention of making 3352. I made this purple-heathered version. It might be my favorite.

dolman 1

2015-01-18 19.11.51-2

Then, a couple of months ago, I made this red version.

image

image

I tried something different with the leopard print one. I used Mood fabric on that one. I wanted to see if I could make a dressier version–one that I could wear to work.

IMGP2627

Then, I made three other versions of this hack (all in Polartec fleece) to give as Christmas gifts. I made a navy, sweater-faced for my 23 year-old niece, and hunter green, sweater-faced for my 22 year-old niece, and black, double-velour for my mother-in-law. Here’s my oldest niece in her navy 3352:

image

After the holiday sewing, I wanted to make things for ME!!!!! Two days ago, I tried 3352 in quilted material with a front zipper.

image

And then yesterday, I made a blue, sweater-faced version.

image

image

image

image

imageimage

This fleece is a medium blue, and I didn’t have any serger/coverstitch thread that would match. So I opted for a contrast color–chartreuse. It looks kind of white in the photos, but it’s really chartreuse.

image

image

And here’s what the hood looks like when it’s not being a cowl neck. The hood definitely requires a fabric that drapes well. I learned that lesson on the quilted version!

image

I know that I will sew this pattern again. It is my drug of choice. I have no shame. It’s the thing that makes me feel like a seamsta. Don’t we all have a garment like that??????

image

image

McCall’s 6840

image

Do y’all ever watch Fixer Upper on HGTV? Joanna Gaines is always  walking around and designing amazing rooms in flannel shirts and boots. She looks so cute and hip, and my 48 year-old self cute could really use some more cute and hip in my life. Sooooooooooooooo….I decided to make my own flannel shirt.

Last year I bought the above plaid flannel at Joann’s and since then, it’s been sitting in my stash. So I brushed off the flannel dust and tried my hand at McCall’s 6840, view B.

6840

I was a little short on fabric–I only had 2 yards–so I cut the yoke, collar, and cuffs in some black plaid that I also had in my stash. Although I did not conceal the buttons, I followed the directions on everything else. The patterns goes together very easily.

image

My sewing machine decided that it did not want to make the programmable buttons that it is supposed to be able to make. This was very frustrating. It did this once before. That time, I cleaned the lint off of the foot and the foot-sensor-light-thing, and the programmable button hole started working again. I tried that this time to no avail. I Googled it, read the manual, cleaned it again, and no dice. Not sure what the problem is. So I went with the manual option on the button holes.

I also inadvertently attached the sleeves on the wrong sides. This became apparent when I put the shirt on and the  slit openings by the cuff were on top of my wrists. They were kind of at 10 o’clock instead of 7 o’clock (where they should be.) My husband said I could leave them there for thumb openings. I thought about the thumb opening option and then pulled out my seam ripper and started ripping.

I like this top and am pretty sure I will be making it again. Watch out Joanna Gaines–I’ll be rocking some flannel shirts too!

image

image

image

image

How about that giant sunflower behind my head????????????????

image

image

BTW, speaking of Joanna Gaines and Fixer Upper, I did get to visit their shop in Waco back in October. We were traveling through Waco on the weekend they opened the Silo. It was so cool!!

image

 

The Vintage Traveler

Fuzzylizzie's Fashion & Travel: Vintage Style

SewBaby News

One woman's quest to become one badass seamstress

Stitched By Me

A place to share projects from my sewing room.

Dog-Daisy Chains

One woman's quest to become one badass seamstress

Posie Gets Cozy

One woman's quest to become one badass seamstress

cathgrace

One woman's quest to become one badass seamstress

Two On Two Off

One woman's quest to become one badass seamstress

One woman's quest to become one badass seamstress

Gertie's New Blog for Better Sewing

One woman's quest to become one badass seamstress

Did You Make That?

A sewing and knitting blog

Amanda's Adventures in Sewing

One woman's quest to become one badass seamstress

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.